Charles G. Woods AIA / Award Winning Architect

 


I have always tried to practice “architecture as art”.  That has not always proven feasible, of course, but I have striven for that as toward an asymptotic goal.  I believe that architecture is an art as well as a science, and that without both it is not really architecture at all.

Ultimately, I believe that art will always tip the balance, even over science, in great architecture.  Of course on some very large buildings it is difficult to separate the two, as on the great Sir Norman Foster’s tall buildings.  But even there the sculptural aspect of a building will always be at least fifty-one percent of its greatness.

Other factors will come into play, too.  In my own work, cost constraints and energy efficiency are usually highlighted, energy efficiency by choice and cost constraints often by necessity.

I am at a point in my career (now at fifty years of age) in which the complete work of architecture is very important to me, and I strongly desire and am committed to doing all aspects of the work, including (where possible) interior decorating, furniture design, landscape design (with my consultants), and some of the artwork.

I have long called my architecture “natural architecture”, but it is really a mixture of pure Euclidean forms incarnated, as it were, into natural and man-made materials.

My studies in philosophy have added an intellectual background to all my work; it is archetypal, geometrical and has even been called spiritual and mystical.

Architecture for me has always been a search -- a search for the Beauty of Intellect.

I would like to thank David Justice, Julie Kettle Gundlach, and my illustrators Ronald P. Schatz, Malcolm Wells, Paul Stevenson Oles, FAIA, Randy Padorr-Black and Tracy Boyle.  Without them, this web site would not be possible.

Finally thanks to my first architectural mentor, Dennis Blair, noted student of Frank Lloyd Wright.

All of our work is under copyright, but feel free to print something out for your corkboard or for a school project.  For other purposes, please contact us for permission.


"Shades of Howard Roarke, the innovative hero of Ayn Rand's novel 'The Fountainhead'. Shades of Frank Lloyd Wright for that matter." - Chicago Sun-Times, 1979.
last update 1/16/11